September 22, 2017

THE WAGON TRAIN IN CHAMPION 2017

 


Seth Keller drove Jim and Judy Cantrell’s wagon at the head of the wagon train.

The West Plains Wagon Club and the Gee and Haw Wagon Club of Viola, Arkansas combined to make a wagon train of four for the one hundred mile trip from West Plains to Mansfield. They pulled into Champion on Thursday the 14th a little ahead of schedule and were met by a nice crowd of people who enjoy seeing the teams and wagons. For some it is a novelty and for others it harkens back to the days when that was the way most folks got around. Absent for the second year, the much missed Clifton Luna was spoken of fondly among waggoneers and spectators alike. He was 91 and, for the first time, not quite up for the trip last year. He passed away in October. He was carried to his grave on a mule drawn wagon—just the way he would have wanted with these folks and many others in attendance.

Jim and Judy Cantrell of Norwood were the first ones in the square. Their wagon was driven by young Seth Keller. Judy said he had driven the whole way since they turned off the pavement there at V Highway. Their mules are Long Ears and Patty. Jerry Sanders has a nice driver too–Toni Amison. They are from Norwood and their mules are Sadie and Buttercup. Ken Felts’ mules are Champ and Lady. In years past he and his friend Randal Barnett would double back through Champion afterwards and spend the night on the square on their way back home to Pocahontas, Arkansas. Mr. Barnett has just had back surgery and so was unable to make the trip this year. His Champion friends will be looking for him next time. Harley Wayne Keller drove the wagon of Jerry and Diane Wilbanks all the way from John Webber’s place. Their mules are Kate, RB and Smokey. Diane had good things to say about Harley’s skill and his pleasant demeanor. John Webber said it had been foggy at his place that morning and when he looked out the kitchen window there were mule ears standing up in it—an interesting vision.

They enjoyed a rest stop for lunch and for visiting with the spectators. Among those who came to enjoy the spectacle were Johny Appleseed (he did not say where he was from), Bob Berry of Drury and Mary Goolsby of Gentryville, Butch and Dawn Stone, Arnold Ahlsteadt, Shirley Brixey of Willow Springs, Kaye and Richard Johnston of Licking, Royce and Jody Henson of Springfield, Mark Keller of Drury, John Webber, Sherry Bennett, Lonnie Curtis, Tom Cooley of Mountain Grove, Skip and Ina Downen of West Plains, Alvin Barnhart, Robert Upshaw, Dean Brixey, Fae Krider, Leo Stofer, Jeff Bartsch, Wes Lambert, Dawn Stine, David Richardson and a number of others. Dawn and David brought their instruments and did some nice picking and singing on the wide veranda there on the Historic Emporium. It was a beautiful day for the outing and, as the wagons topped the hill on their way out of town, Champions were already looking forward to next year. It will pass quickly though that leisurely pace of the wagon train tugs at us to slow down and enjoy every passing day here in Champion—Looking on the Bright Side!


Ken Felts of Pocahontas, Arkansas represented the Gee and Haw Wagon Club.


Harley Wayne Keller drove Jerry and Diane Wilbanks’ three up.


The wagon folks are pleased to show off their teams and outfits for the locals.

 


The Wagon Train draws an audience from far and wide.

 


There was ample time for some good visiting.

 

Jerry Sanders and Toni Amiston on their way out of the Square.


Up and over the hill leaving Champions waiting for next year.

Farewell!
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October 20, 2015

2015 Skyline School Fall Festival


The silent auction set up in the hallway featured some extraordinary student art as well as
Silver Dollar City tickets and a number of items donated by local merchants.

James Brixey, Joshua Strong and Joseph Georges struggle under the
awesome responsibility of judging the pie contest.

Donna and Paul Boyd are always in the middle of the good times at Skyline.

Pumpkin contest entries.

Eli Johnson is a kindergarten student. His teacher is Mrs. Sartor. He won a cup with the message “Love Ya!” “Actually,” Eli said, “it’s a mug.”

Bridget Hicks won Best Pie in the contest. She has three sons in Skyline.
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September 22, 2015

2015 Wagon Train

Wagon-Master Coy Stone strolls across the Champion Square with purpose—ice cream.

Resting on the shady banks of Old Fox Creek: Earl Duke’s wagon on the left, the Websters in blue; Jim and Judy Cantrell, and Jerry Sanders wagon with the hay on the back.

Marvin and Nancy Webster have downsized. Here they are in their new rig with Coco and Pete.

Ken Felts trails a spare mule, Champ, another that he has raised.

Judy Cantrell standing, will be leaving the train in Mansfield while the others go on to complete 387 miles in 18 days. Also pictured Ken Felts, Ms. Sanders and Jim Cantrell.

Locals visiting the wagon train are Royce Henson talking with Vernon Crow under the Champion Bee Tree. Joyce Coonts is taking Cowboy Jack’s picture with wagon-master Coy Stone.

Randall Barnet belongs to four other wagon and riding clubs in addition to the West Plains Wagon Club and the Gee Haw Club of Viola, Arkansas.

Chief, Lady and Amos pulling us up the hill. Up ahead is Vernon Crow, Randall Barnet and Coy Stone in the lead.

Earl Duke waves good bye. He has this wagon borrowed from Coy Stone who built it. Earl is using this one until Coy gets one built for him. This is his third year on this ride.

The Websters bring up the drag. Good bye for another year. Happy trails!

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September 30, 2014

2014 West Plains Wagon Club Trail Ride

On the Square

 

Wagon Master Clifton Luna leads the West Plains Wagon Club out of Champion.

Mr. Luna’s wagon is followed by Jerry and Diane Wilbanks with their extra mule trailing behind. Jerry and Diane have the only white mules on the train this year. One of the white mules had a severe accident last year, but with the help of their granddaughter, Candice, they were able to nurse the animal through its injury.

Jerry and Bonnie Arnold follow the Wilbanks out of the Champion Square. Their beautiful sorrel mules are well matched.

The Arnolds lead Jim and Judy Cantrell.

The Cantrells lead Ken Felts. Ken has a nicely matched three up pulling his vinyl covered wagon.

Randal Burnet has a three up pulling his big wagon.

Coy Stone’s is the last wagon out of the Champion Square.

With Candice Summer and Nate Williams riding drag, the train goes up and over the hill on the way to Cold Springs and then on to rest for the night. Good bye!
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October 30, 2013

Ms. McCallie’s Letter of October 21, 2013

Dear Wilda,

This is a poem my Father, (Blake Haden) wrote when we were in Reedley, California in January, 1930.

We’d left Ava, MO in October, 1929, after selling our farm at the insistence of my Aunt Allie Huffman.  She was Dad’s only sister.  She had six other brothers, but my Dad was her favorite.

He,(my Dad) was a carpenter and a good one too and Aunt Allie said her other brothers were working my Dad to death, he was working for them daily from sun up to sun down for $.75 a day and it made Aunt Allie very angry at them for treating Daddy like that and she told them so.  And on this occasion, she’d just returned from California and came to see my Dad and says, “Blake, I want you to sell this ‘torn down’ farm and go to California with me.  You can make more there in one day than you can here in a month doing what you’re doing now.  So Daddy sold our farm, and bought a new 1929 Model A Ford Coach, paid $628.00 for it–full price then.  Can you imagine that?

But the car salesman (Harry Martin) at that time, says to my Dad, “Now Blake you tell me you have four young children at home and you’re going to where you’ve never been and you aren’t sure whether you’ll get work soon after you arrive there, so I suggest that you pay me $400.00 and keep the $228.00 for food, etc. in case you don’t get a job right away.  But in case that does or doesn’t happen, I’m going to give you the title to the car anyway, so’s you’ll not have any trouble as you cross the state lines of Missouri and Kansas, and etc.”  (Because) At that time it was a Federal Crime to cross a state line in a mortgaged car.  So Daddy did as the salesman asked him to and after arriving in California, Daddy didn’t find a job, as he looked and hunted everywhere, so he had to use the $228.00 for food, rent, and gas for the car.  And after a few weeks, ad detective came and took the car and put Daddy in jail, till my Grandpa and uncles, raised enough money to pay the $228.99 which took ten days.  And it just literally broke my heart to see my Daddy in jail.  So that’s when he wrote this poem that I’m sending you.  I’m telling you all of this sos’s you’ll know why Daddy was in jail.  I was so thrilled and happy when he got out.

Tell Mrs. Henson, Hello for me and Thank you so much again. 

Please write again,

Sincerely, Ethel

The following poem was written in January 1930 by Blake Haden when we were in Reedley, California, to his parents, Rezin and Frances Haden.


Dearest Parents,

This is my lamentation.  Oh how I’ve lived my life
By following willful Satan, trying not to do the right.
My past life was so wasted, my road, oh how entwined
With briars, thorns and brambles, with sunlite it was not lined.
 
I walked through prayers of Christians, I heard them pray for me.
That I would be the Christian, that I had ought to be.
But yet I walked with Satan, in the road that is so wide
Heeding not the voice of Jesus as he walked so close beside.
 
Still I heeded not the voice, till it was most too late
And now a California prison holds me behind it’s gate.
So in the Reedley jail house, and the iron door is on me closed
My sins loomed up like mountains, I could not sleep in sweet repose.
 
Still I heard My Savior calling, in that sweet low tone
And about the hour of midnight, I heard Him Bid me come.
As on my knees I bended, my burdens how hard to bear
I prayed to Him for Mercy, religion seemed so near.
 
And my children, Oh! God bless them, how I long to teach them true.
Train them how to serve their master, Jesus Christ their Savior too!
May they never, oh no never walk the pathway that I’ve trod.
For it is a road of trouble, and is not the way of God.
 
Pray that I will walk the pathway, in the strait and narrow way.
Shunning all the snares, and pitfalls scattered all along the way.
Oh! My soul now feels so happy, All my sins are washed away.
Pray that I will do His bidding, till my body turns to clay.

This poem was recopied by his daughter
Ethel Haden McCallie, April 30th, 2001

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